1923

April 3 2010

“Oxford, in those days, was still a city of aquatint. In her spacious and quiet streets men walked and spoke as they had done in Newman’s day; her autumnal mists, her grey springtime, and the rare glory of her summer days – such as that day – when the chestnut was in flower and the bells rang out high and clear over her gables and cupolas, exhaled the soft vapours of a thousand years of learning. It was this cloistral hush which gave our laughter its resonance, and carried it still, joyously, over the intervening clamour.”

___

Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited, 1945. It is the aquatint and the Newman that make this unforgettable. “Still”, ie over the intervening clamour of two decades.

One Response to “1923”

  1. davidderrick Says:

    The influence of this book on generations of subsequent Oxford undergraduates has been, to understate it, unfortunate.


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