Chinese whispers

May 23 2011

The Tang dynasty lasted from 618 to 907. The Sui (581-618) had reunited China for the first time since the Han. The Tang emperors preserved this unity.

Mahler discovered the Tang poems which he used in Das Lied von der Erde through some German versions by Hans Bethge. Bethge published his Die chinesische Flöte in 1907.

Here are texts in Chinese, French, German and English of the first poem that Mahler set. Except for the English translation of Mahler’s version, they are from mahlerarchives.net, with some minor changes or clarifications. I’ve made the semi-literal version more readable.

I don’t know who made the two English translations. The English translation of Mahler’s version is more or less as on a YouTube page.

___

A poem by Li Bai; the unbracketed part was the source of the first of Mahler’s six settings:

Li Bai was also the source of three of the other settings.

___

Semi-literal translation of the unbracketed part as Tale of Sorrowful Song:

“Sorrow comes, sorrow comes,
Host has wine, pour not yet.
Listen to my sorrowful song.
Sorrow approaches, neither sob nor laugh.
Nobody in this world knows my heart;
You have several measures of wine,
I have a three-foot lute;
Lute playing goes with happy drinking,
One drink equals a thousand taels of gold.

Sorrow comes, sorrow comes,
Everlasting as the heaven and the earth,
Yet a roomful of gold and jade shall not last.
A hundred years of wealth amounts to what?
Everyone lives and dies only once;
A lonely ape sits over the grave and howls at the moon.
I must empty this cup of wine in one gulp.”

___

Translation from the Chinese by the Marquis D’Hervey Saint-Denys as La chanson du chagrin:

“Le maître de céans a du vin,
mains ne le versez pas encore:
Attendez que je vous aie chanté
La chanson du chagrin.

Quand le chagrin vient,
si je cesse de chanter ou de rire,
Personne, dans ce monde, ne connaîtra
les sentiments de mon cœur.

Seigneur, vous avez quelques measures de vin,
Et moi je posséde un luth long de trios pieds;
Jouer du luth et boire du vin sont deux choses
qui vont bien ensemble.
Une tasse de vin vaut, en son temps, mille onces d’or.

Bien que le ciel ne périsse point,
Bien que la terre soit de longue durée,
Combien pourra durer pour nous
la possession de l’or et du jade?
Cent ans au plus. Voilà le terme
de la plus longue espérance.
Vivre et mourir une fois,
voilà ce dont tout homme est assuré.

Écoutez là-bas, sous les rayons de la lune,
Écoutez le singe accroupi qui pleure,
tout seul, sur les tombeaux
Et maintenant remplissez ma tasse;
il est temps de la vader d’un seul trait.”

Some lines were split into two to fit into the column here.

___

Hans Heilman published a book called Chinesische Lyrik in 1907 in which he translates Hervey de Saint Denys. I can’t find it, but Bethge adapted Heilman’s version in his book of the same year. Hervey de Saint Denys knew Chinese. I presume Heilman and Bethge did not.

Bethge’s version:

“Schon winkt der Wein im goldenen Pokalen,
Doch trinkt noch nicht, erst sing ich euch ein Lied!
Das Lied vom Kummer soll euch in die Seele
Auflachend klingen! Wenn der Kummer naht,
So stirbt die Freude, der Gesang erstirbt,
Wüst liegen die Gemächer meiner Seele.

Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod.
Dein Keller birgt des goldnen Weins die Fülle
Herr dieses Hauses, – ich besitze andres:

Hier diese lange Laute nenn ich mein!
Die Laute schlagen und die Gläser leeren,
Das sind zwei Dinge, die zusammen passen!
Ein voller Becher Weins zur rechten Zeit
Ist mehr wert als die Reiche dieser Erde.
Dunkel is das Leben, ist der Tod.

Das Firmament blaut ewig und die Erde
Wird lange feststehn auf den alten Füssen,
Du aber, Mensch, wie lang lebst denn du?
Nicht hundert Jahre darfst du dich ergötzen
An all dem morschen Tande dieser Erde,
Nur ein Besitztum ist dir ganz gewiss:
Das ist das Grab, das grinsende, am Erde.
Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod.

Sehr dort hinab! Im Mondschein auf den Gräbern
Hockt eine wild-gespenstische Gestalt –
Ein Affe ist es! Hört ihr, wie sein Heulen hinausgellt
In den süßen Duft des Abends!
Jetzt nehmt den Wein! Jetzt ist es Zeit, Genossen!
Leert eure goldnen Becher bis zum Grund!
Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod!”

___

Mahler’s version, Das Trinklied vom Jammer der Erde, based on Bethge; was that Heilman’s title, Bethge’s or his own?:

“Schon winkt der Wein im goldnen Pokale,
Doch trinkt noch nicht, erst sing ich euch ein Lied!
Das Lied vom Kummer soll auflachend
In die Seele euch klingen. Wenn der Kummer naht,
Liegen wüst die Gärten der Seele,
Welkt hin und stirbt die Freude, der Gesang.
Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod.

Herr dieses Hauses!
Dein Keller birgt die Fülle des goldenen Weins!
Hier, diese Laute nenn’ ich mein!
Die Laute schlagen und die Gläser leeren,
Das sind die Dinge, die zusammen passen.
Ein voller Becher Weins zur rechten Zeit
Ist mehr wert, ist mehr wert, ist mehr wert als alle Reiche dieser Erde!
Dunkel is das Leben, ist der Tod.

Das Firmament blaut ewig und die Erde
Wird lange fest stehen und aufblühn im Lenz.
Du aber, Mensch, wie lang lebst denn du?
Nicht hundert Jahre darfst du dich ergötzen
An all dem morschen Tande dieser Erde!

Seht dort hinab! Im Mondschein auf den Gräbern
Hockt eine wildgespenstische Gestalt –
Ein Aff ist’s! Hört ihr, wie sein Heulen hinausgellt
In den süßen Duft des Lebens!
Jetzt nehm den Wein! Jetzt ist es Zeit, Genossen!
Leert eure goldnen Becher zu Grund!
Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod!”

___

Drinking Song of the Misery of the Earth, English translation of Mahler’s version (from YouTube):

“The wine is already beckoning in the golden goblet,
But do not drink yet – first, I will sing you a song!
The song of sorrow shall resound
Laughingly in your soul. When sorrow draws near,
The gardens of the soul will lie desolate,
Wilting; joy and song will die.
Dark is life, dark is death.

Lord of this house!
Your cellar is full of golden wine!
Here, this lute I call my own!
Strumming on the lute and emptying glasses –
These are the things that go together.
A full glass of wine at the proper moment
Is worth more than all the riches of the world!
Dark is life, dark is death.

The heavens are forever blue and the earth
Will stand firm for a long time and bloom in spring.
But you, Man, how long will you live then?
Not a hundred years are you allowed to enjoy
In all the rotten triviality of this earth!

Look down there!
In the moonlight, on the graves
Crouches a wild, ghostly figure – It is an ape!
Hear how its howls resound piercingly
In the sweet fragrance of life!
Now take the wine! Now is the time – enjoy it!
Empty the golden goblet to the bottom!
Dark is life, dark is death!”

___

The Mahlerian end-product, with Klemperer, the Philharmonia and Fritz Wunderlich, the best-balanced recording, and not a hint of strain in Wunderlich:

Dunkel ist das Leben, ist der Tod! seems to belong more to the Nietzsche poem.

4 Responses to “Chinese whispers”

  1. davidderrick Says:

    Did Waley translate this poem?


  2. […] Other poems by him were the source of four of Mahler’s settings in Das Lied von der Erde. Post. […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s